How To See Six Waterfalls In One Day!

"Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference." ~Robert Frost
“Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.” ~Robert Frost

Yesterday, we headed out for our first parents only trip in six years. It was hard to leave our sixteen year-old, but she will have a blast with her 29 year-old sister; especially, riding around in sister’s new Jeep with the top off! They’ve got manicures and pedicures on the schedule, as well. Sounds like great sister bonding time!

As usual, Darren planned a wonderful trip. We got out of town yesterday around 3:30pm. We wanted to make it to Memphis to maximize our day today. We did make it to the East side of Memphis which we’ve found is a nice area right off I-40 to stay with plenty of eating options.

We arrived late so the snacks in the car were our dinner. Which brings me to a few travel tips, pack:
•    snacks within reach in the car
•    drinks, think about what you’d want to drink with your snacks, water for taking medications and for staying hydrated, and whatever you’d drink for breakfast if you don’t drink coffee or juice. (Are we the only rare people that don’t drink either?)
•    hiking boots in a plastic tote and take a pair of flip flops/crocs/slides for swapping out after a hike. The tote will keep the dirt/mud contained and makes for easy clean up. We leave the tote with the dirty boots in the car and change into and out of our boots at the car. Keeps the hotel/cabin cleaner too!
•    a gallon size ziplock bag to collect all your hotel soaps. (We are collecting this time for my daughter’s mission trip to Brazil this summer.)
•    an old towel and some wipes to clean any mud off your legs (I usually kick myself and get mud right above my boot. Maybe I just need to learn how to walk.)

We didn’t have a room reserved for the night so I drove while Darren did his magic on TripAdvisor. We stayed at a nice Hyatt Place Hotel. It had one of the best hotel free breakfasts we’ve ever had. Well, besides the one in San Antonio that had a breakfast taco bar. All South Texans would agree, breakfast tacos rock!

After breakfast we snagged a couple apples for our hike and loaded up for our next stop…Greeter Falls in Monteagle, Tennessee. Last summer we did this hike. Little did we know there had been a drought and it was a trickle!

When we first left Memphis headed east, the speed limit was only 65mph on the interstate. It was a nice speed trap with cops everywhere. I don’t recall it being like this before but just beware if you are doing that way. Even after the speed limit changed to 70mph, the cops were still out until at least Jackson. Maybe that’s why I -40 in Tennessee is better than in Arkansas? They can afford to fix the roads! Haha!

Stopped for lunch at one of our favorites, Whitts Barbecue. Doesn’t look like much from the outside but the food is always great.

Free Maps!
Free Maps!

We always like to stop at the ranger station or park headquarters before we set out on hikes. They can tell you water levels, and if there are any hazards to look out for on the trails. They usually have great maps and even a visual small scale mountain map…I am sure that has a fancy name but it escapes me at this moment. It’s 10:35pm, I hiked to six waterfalls at this point and I am beyond pooped so help me out…

When we stopped for the info, we were reminded of all the many falls that were in this area. We intended on only hiking to two that were pretty short. We decided to take on the Grundy Forest Day Loop with the extra 1.2 miles for Sycamore Falls. The water was high and the falls were full. In fact, we entered the loop to the right and passed several mini falls and cascades along the way. The trail is nice, ups, downs and flats. Don’t be fooled by the sign like the couple was that passed us on the trail. They thought the Sycamore Falls sign said 6 miles when it said .6 miles. You cross over a nice bridge to get to that trail and it is a stunning hike. A few narrow points but other than that it was great. We finished out the loop in a hurry as we wanted to make it to Greeter Falls before dark.

Again, the ranger gave us great directions along with addresses that we could put in our GPS so getting from one fall to another was a piece of cake. Greeter is in the Savage Gulf State Natural Area. The trail was muddy so we knew it would have water in the fall. It didn’t disappoint! It was worth the trek down the spiral staircase and other stairs.

Greeter Falls
Greeter Falls

After, we climbed out with shaky legs, we decided to go ahead to Boardtree Falls. That short little hike revealed my favorite of the day. The last time we were here it was completely dry. Not even a trickle. Today was amazing! Such a beautiful cascading fall.

See Darren at the bottom of Boardtree Falls!
See Darren at the bottom of Boardtree Falls!

We ended our day arriving at Fall Creek Falls State Park. We’ve been here before too. Enjoyed a nice dinner in their lodge. I had the salmon and Darren had the buffet. We are settled in for the night and will hike the falls in this park in the morning before heading on to Gatlinburg, Tennessee.

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Don’t Make This Mistake When Buying Hiking Boots!

Get the right hiking boots.
Pinecone in Sequoia National Park
Does this pinecone make my foot look small?

Size Matters!

The first mistake I made in buying a new pair of hiking boots was buying them in my size. When we first started hiking I didn’t know much about hiking or gear. We went to a local sporting goods store to try on hiking boots. I wanted something cute and comfortable. I knew I wanted high tops for the ankle support. Unfortunately, there wasn’t many cute ones to choose from but I found a pair that was comfy and high top. I purchased a size eight. In dress shoes/boots I normally were a seven and a half. I went up a half size to compensate for the thicker hiking socks.

Out on the trail, I quickly learned that my hiking boots were too small.  When you’re on a flat trail or go up a steep hill they fit just fine but coming back down that incline your feet slide forward in the boots smooshing your toes into the boots. Yes, I said smooshing. I’m from Texas and we say that. Needless to say, my little piggies weren’t very happy with me. No matter how tight I laced them, you can’t beat gravity, and my foot would slide.

I logged plenty of miles in those boots but the next time we went hiking boot shopping we went to a store more equip for selling hiking boots. It had a ramp you could walk up and down when trying on the boots. This time around I purchased a size 10! Much better! No more toe smooshing!

Above all, size is the most important thing to think about when ordering or purchasing hiking boots.

Two reasons to rethink your size:

  1. Downhill
  2. Thick socks

Something else to consider, waterproof boots.  Darren and I both have completely waterproof boots. Not rain boots but waterproof hiking boots. At first, we weren’t sure if we would need waterproof or not but it sure has been nice especially since we are waterfall chasers. We have been able to walk right through shallow streams, right up to waterfalls and even wore them on the rugged beaches of Northern California when the water was freezing our toes were still dry! I personally don’t think the waterproofing makes them hotter than usual, maybe it is the great wicking socks that keep our feel cool.

Purchasing hiking boots is completely optional obviously but I can tell you first hand that my high tops have saved me many times from sprained ankles on rugged or rocky trails. We have seen people in all types of shoes out on the trails. From dress boots, to flip flops and everything in between. I can’t imagine doing that to my feet. I want to enjoy my hike and keep my feet safely blister-free for my next hike!

Our current boots our older models now but are similar to these:

Another option for you may be trail running shoes. My current favorites are pictured below. I am not currently running any trails but the tread on the bottom serves the same purpose when hiking those trails. I love that this shoe comes in cute colors and is very reasonably priced. I just ordered these pink ones from

Trail Shoes
Thick tread!

Amazon. These shoes have outlasted my normal running shoes because of the thicker tread. When we are at home, we walk on a roughly paved road two-four miles every evening. The tread on these can handle it!

Saucony Excursion TR9 Trail Running Shoes
Saucony Trail Running Shoes

Overall things to consider when shopping for hiking boots/shoes:

  1. Size Matters
  2. High top vs. Low  (we recommend high or mid)
  3. Waterproof vs. Mesh
  4. Sock type

 

 

 

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13 Things You Should Have in Your Backpack

backpack
Does this backpack make my…

Darren is the backpack carrier. He has lugged too many water bottles to count up the side of the mountain for us. We usually take two or three per person depending on the length of the hike. One for the way up, one for the picnic and one for the way down. While we are cautious of bear, we don’t use a bear proof specific back pack but we do take precautions.

  1. Put all food in ziplock bags, then in a larger ziplock, and then into your pack. Bears have a strong sense of smell.
  2. Do the same with your trash sealing it back in the ziplocks. Pack it in, pack it out! Bears are killed when they get comfortable around people and cause problems. It all starts with us and how we pack.
  3. Don’t leave your pack unattended.

Here is a list of what we usually pack:

  1. Water
  2. Snacks and/or picnic
  3. Whistle-scares bear and helps people find you if you get lost.
  4. Flashlight– it can get dark fast in the mountain. We have this one because it is also a taser!
  5. Rain poncho– storms can come on quickly.
  6. First Aid Kit
  7. Small towel
  8. Pocket knife
  9. Compass
  10. Bug spray
  11. Toilet Paper
  12. I also take chapstick because I don’t leave home without it. Don’t judge me.
  13. Darren also takes gum but don’t spit it on the trail it’s bad for wildlife.

If you want a bear proof bag, here is a suggestion. The backpack linked in the post is the closest I could find to ours. Ours is ten years old! The best thing is to get one that has the water bottle holders on the side and that is water resistant.

Happy trails!

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